The Portrait of a Spiritual Leader (III)

The Vision of a Leader

Nehemiah 2:4-5 (NIV) The king said to me, “What is it you want?” Then I prayed to the God of heaven, and I answered the king, “If it pleases the king and if your servant has found favor in his sight, let him send me to the city in Judah where my fathers are buried so that I can rebuild it.

Vision as Revelation

The leader’s burden and prayer is that the God’s kingdom comes and His will is done on earth in our time and context. Hence, God’s will becomes the leader’s life purpose and vision. For Nehemiah, the need of the time was about having the wall of Jerusalem built.

For Moses it was to take the people of Israel from Exile to the Promised Land. “So now, go. I am sending you to Pharaoh to bring my people the Israelites out of Egypt.” (Exodus 3:10). For prophet Isaiah, it was to be God’s spokesperson to the people of Israel. “Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” He said, “Go and tell this people: “‘Be ever hearing, but never understanding; be ever seeing, but never perceiving.’” (Isaiah 6:8-9). For Jesus Christ, the vision was “to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19).

God’s Agenda

If, as Richard and Henry Blackaby put that spiritual leadership is about “moving people onto God’s agenda,” then God must necessarily determine what the agenda is. The question that every spiritual leader should ask is, “What is God’s will for His people?” The vision speaks of the desired future–about God’s agenda for His people. This means that the spiritual leader’s mind should be saturated with God’s word and the spirit attuned to the Spirit of God.

More than We Expect

What really matters is not the grandness of the vision (from the human point of view) but that the vision is from the Lord. As a matter of fact, many God-given visions seem to be ridiculous to those who do not know God. They do not usually fit into our human (and selfish) expectations. Otherwise how could someone like Moses, in his 80s begin to think of leading a bunch of slaves who had neither and civic or military experience, to the Promised Land; a place he himself had never been to? According to him, he was unqualified. “Who am I, that I should go to Pharaoh and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?” (Exodus 3:11) He actually implored the Lord to “send someone else to do it” (Exodus 4:13 ). But once leaders catch this vision, it drives their entire lives. It is what motivates their choices and lifestyle. Jesus Christ was apt about his life-mission: “My food…is to do the will of him who sent me and to finish his work (John 4:34)

Questions for Reflection:

  1. What is God stirring your heart to be and to do in your generation?
  2. Do you have it written down?
  3. How does vision affect how to live your day-to-day life?

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Shepherding God’s People

1 Peter 5:1-4 (NIV) To the elders among you, I appeal as a fellow elder, a witness of Christ’s sufferings and one who also will share in the glory to be revealed: Be shepherds of God’s flock that is under your care, serving as overseers– not because you must, but because you are willing, as God wants you to be; not greedy for money, but eager to serve; not lording it over those entrusted to you, but being examples to the flock.  And when the Chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the crown of glory that will never fade away.

Feed God’s Flock

Apostle Peter reiterates the same charge that he himself received from the Lord Jesus Christ (see John 21:15-17). The one single most important role of the pastor or elder is to be “shepherds of God’s flock that is under your care” (verse 2). This includes providing pastoral and biblical oversight, discipline, instruction, counseling so that the people of God can grow into Christ-like maturity.  Shepherds need to guard themselves against the negative motivations for pastoral ministry such as working out of obligation, being greedy, or bossy. Instead they should serve because they are willing, eager, and exemplary.  Shepherds should also know that they are really under-shepherds, with the Chief-shepherd being Jesus Christ who will at the end reward those who are faithful.

Do you have a pastoral responsibility in your church (such as pastor, elder, small group leader, women’s leader, etc.)? How do you measure up in light of today’s passage?

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Humble Yourself before God

Young men, in the same way be submissive to those who are older. All of you, clothe yourselves with humility toward one another, because, “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.” Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you (1 Peter 5:5-7).

Young people are ambitious and active. But they can also be easily entrapped by pride. Pride may cause them to despise the wisdom of those who are older than them, thus making the pastoral ministry hard. We all need to know, though, that pride is not exclusive to the youth. Pride puts us on the wrong side of God. “God opposes the proud”(verse 5). No one would want to have God as their opponent. In the highly competitive world that we live in, it is easy to get worried about promotions, accomplishments or worldly accolades. Keep in mind that it is always rewarding when God promotes us in His own time. We, therefore, should not be anxious or stressed out about human accomplishments but rather look up to God who deeply cares for us.

Do you sometimes find yourself in unhealthy competition for recognition and promotion? It is wise to wait on God to “lift you up” in His time.

 

 

Shepherd-Leaders

1 Timothy 41-2 (NIV) In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction.

Anyone who has ever been involved in pastoral ministry knows how exciting it can be, especially when you see the people under your care growing and living their God-given dreams. But not all is rosy in this ministry. It can also be stressful and daunting. Many a pastor does not have a clear job description, let alone a defined work schedule. Many people in the congregation expect their pastors to be as perfect and sinless as Jesus Christ. But every pastor knows how imperfect and inadequate they are (if you doubt ask their spouses). Yet they have to be strong, always being there for those who are hurting—most of the time at the expense of missing their own family opportunities.

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Pastors are as human as anyone else. They hurt, they need, they face temptations, and they struggle. The salaries of many pastors around the world are way lower than those of an average CEO in their contexts. As a matter of fact most pastors in the majority world do not even earn a salary, so they resort to being bi-vocational in order sustain their families. The irony is that their church members expect them to give full-time commitment to their pastoral obligations, even when they are not compensated for their work.

It is alright to have high expectations of our pastors—and we should for every leader. But remember that we can easily confuse unrealistic expectations for high ones. Pastors cannot lead the church to the desired success unless everyone is involved; praying, encouraging and doing what they are supposed to do. Remember that the church is the “body of Christ” and just like you and me, pastors are just a part of that body. For the entire body to be healthy, every part has to do its part.

 

Instructions for Christian Living

1 Thessalonians 5:12-22 (NIV) Now we ask you, brothers and sisters, to acknowledge those who work hard among you, who care for you in the Lord and who admonish you. Hold them in the highest regard in love because of their work. Live in peace with each other. And we urge you, brothers and sisters, warn those who are idle and disruptive, encourage the disheartened, help the weak, be patient with everyone. Make sure that nobody pays back wrong for wrong, but always strive to do what is good for each other and for everyone else. Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not treat prophecies with contempt but test them all; hold on to what is good, reject every kind of evil.

Relating with Other Christians (12-15)

Christian living is all about relationships. We relate vertically with God by worshiping and obeying Him. On the horizontal plane, we relate with other people. The Word of God tells us to honor our spiritual leaders. Pastoral ministry is a high calling and rewarding but it can also be hard and stressful. Pastors work hard to lead, teach and guide the people of God. Therefore believer are instructed to respect and honor them.  Respect for our spiritual leaders is a Christian virtue (see Hebrews 13:17). Have you been an encouragement to your spiritual leader lately? Find a practical way to let your them know that you appreciate the work they are doing.

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Christian Spiritual Disciplines (16-22)

Christian life is dynamic. For a Christian to grow in one’s relationship with God they ought to practice certain Godly habits. The Word of God highlights some of them such as: joyfulness, thanksgiving, being open to the work of the Spirit in our lives, discernment, and moral purity. We can be confident that living out the above disciplines is possible because of the grace of God available to us. The grace of God empowers us to do the will of God. God is wholly committed to us. He provides all that it takes for us to lead a life worthy of Him. Where in your Christian walk do you feel you are doing well? Which Godly habits do you think you need to develop?

 

Being Caring Christ-Like Community

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Mark 10:13-16  (NIV) People were bringing little children to Jesus to have him touch them, but the disciples rebuked them. When Jesus saw this, he was indignant. He said to them, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. I tell you the truth, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” And he took the children in his arms, put his hands on them and blessed them.

In the last couple of weeks I have been sharing on the implications of our identity and purpose as followers of Jesus Christ. We have been called by God to live for Him—to make Him look great. How we express our purpose, of living for God, largely depends on our different contexts.

For starters, let’s ponder on these questions?

  1. If you were a pastor of a local church, what kind of people would you pray that they come to your church? What motivates that desire?
  2. Which kind of people do like to you associate with? What motivates your choice of friends?

In the story of Jesus blessings little children we see in the disciples’ response a reflection of many of us when it comes to living out our faith. As we know, Jesus’ actions almost always shocked everyone, even those closest to Him. His actions were unconventional and counter-culture. But there was also something predictable about Him in whatever He did; He wanted to please the Father. He touched and cleansed lepers, ate and drank with sinners, was anointed by former prostitutes. He reached out to those regarded as the dregs of the society. He loved those who rejected Him. He died for those who crucified Him.

In the Bible passage above, Jesus’ disciples felt that He should spend His time doing better things—meeting the important and influential people. But Jesus had a different idea. He chose to spend time (and bless) the children. Children were: vulnerable, often ignored by adults, powerless and had no social, political or religious influence. Therefore, according to the disciples, time spent with children was considered wasted. We demonstrate Christ-like character when we act the way Jesus acted—by choosing not to live by the dictates of our societal values but His.

The community in which our local church is located has very many children. We minister to hundreds of them every month by sharing with them the word of God, dancing with them, offering them a cup of hot porridge and bread. As church, Children’s Ministry is one of our local expressions of what it means to be a Caring, Christ-Like Community.

Reflection:

  1. Who are “the least of these” (cf. Matthew 25:40) in your community?
  2. What is an appropriate expression of what it means to be a Caring, Christ-Like Community in your context?
  3. What is God calling you (as an individual or body of believers in Jesus Christ) to do in your community?

 

Called to Be Influencers

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Matthew 5:13-16 (NIV)  “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.

 

Our Identity

“You are”

  1. The Salt of the Earth (verse 13)
  2. The Light of the World (verse 14)

Both of these images have a positive influence–salt as a preservative and enhancing flavor to the food, and light illuminating the world. They are both accessible in virtually anywhere in the world, to anyone, whether rich or poor.

BUT they also operate differently; salt has to disappear (dissolve) for it to be effective. So, one can say it works in a discreet, covert manner. On the other hand, light is necessarily visible: “people [do not] light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house” (Matthew 5:15).  Its influence is overt.

As followers of Jesus Christ, we have a calling to influence the world whether covertly or overtly. We are all challenged “to live a life worthy of the calling [we] have received” (Ephesians 4:1). In what ways can make your life count?

Our Mission

“Let Your Light Shine”

This is what we were called to do: to be change-agents, to be influencers. Just as light casts away the darkness that is around it, and salt enhances the flavor of the food, we are called to manifest God’s love, grace, mercy and justice in our various spheres of influence. God has wired and positioned us differently to accomplish this task. Apostle James says that our faith has practical ramifications. “Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world” (James 1:27). The woman named Tabitha (also known as Dorcas) lived as salt and light in her community. She “was always doing good and helping the poor” (Acts 9:36). When she died, the widows she had helped were “crying and showing [Peter] the robes and other clothing that Dorcas   had made while she was still with them (Acts 9:39). For these widows, the death of Tabitha meant that their light had gone off. How are you manifesting the light of Jesus in your community? Just like salt can only be effective when it is out of the saltshaker, we cannot shine while we keep our faith private. Our faith must necessarily be expressed in the context of the community.

Our Purpose

The Glory of God

“…let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).

After a good meal, no one ever praises the salt, for the flavor it enhances, instead the praise goes to the cook. We do not shine, to attract praise to ourselves but to the ONE who called us. As we shared last week, we were created to live for the audience of ONE, to make God look great. This is our life purpose.

Our faith must necessarily be expressed in the context of the community.

The Hallmark of a Christ-like Community (II)

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Living for God’s Glory

1 Peter 2:9 (NIV)  But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s special possession, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light.

Last week we looked at our identity as a Christ-like community. It is this identity (who we are) that defines our purpose (what we are here for). This week, we will focus on what we are here for? As someone put it we would like to examine whether what we are living for worth dying for. How do we, as people of God, measure our success? Do we go by the world’s parameters of money, status, titles? As a church is our purpose to have big congregations, a plethora of programs, big and state of the art buildings and technology? Although none of the above is in and of itself bad,  we cannot make it the heart of our existence–our purpose.

 

The Audience of ONE

The Word of God is clear about the purpose of the church (the people of God): “that you may declare the praises of him who called you out…”  This seems a pretty straight forward statement–and it is. But some of you might be asking, “yes, but how?” How do we declare God’s praises? How do we live for God’s glory? How do we make God look great in our lives and ministries? How do we live for the audience of ONE? This is a very difficult thing to do in our present generation that exalts “self” (or is it selfie) above everything else. How do we direct praises (fame) to God and not ourselves?

Your Context is Your Platform

Every single person and church community has a unique context which is a potential platform for living for God’s glory. Whether it is in an upscale urban setting, inner city slum, or rural setting you can live for God’s glory. You can make God look great whether you are working with professionals, single mothers, sex workers or orphaned children. The key thing is to discern where God has placed you and the opportunities (often disguised as challenges, or problems) your context offers you to shine for God’s glory.

Is it a Big Deal?

One might ask whether orienting our mission around the glory of God is such a big deal. Yes, it is. God is passionate about his glory. He declares in Isaiah 42:8 that “I am the LORD; that is my name! I will not give my glory to another or my praise to idols.” God forbade Moses from entering the Promised Land because Moses “you disobeyed my command to honor me as holy” before the people of Israel (Numbers 27:14). God takes His glory serious. The reason He created us, the reason he saved us, the reason the church exists is to live for His glory. That is our purpose.