The Portrait of a Spiritual Leader (II)

Divine Connection

Nehemiah 2:4 (NIV) The king said to me, “What is it you want?” Then I prayed to the God of heaven

What essentially differentiates a spiritual leader from any other leader is the one’s relationship with God. Nehemiah’s life was marked by an unwavering faith in the God of Israel. His devotion to God was greater than his personal comfort, safety or reputation. It was this relationship with God that motivated him to go to Jerusalem to facilitate the rebuilding of the wall. We can know about Nehemiah’s relationship with God through his prayers which are all over book of Nehemiah.

Likewise, our relationship with God is enhanced by a lifestyle of prayer. One’s prayer life tells us a lot about their faith in God. If we take God and His promises seriously, then prayer must be an essential part of our lives. It is like the air we breathe.

One may ask, “But when and how should we pray?” First of all, the Bible tells us to pray at all times–without ceasing (see 1 Thessalonians 5:17). Nehemiah prayed at all times. When he received disturbing news about the state of the people and the city of Jerusalem, he prayed. He worshiped, confessed his sins and those of his people, pleaded with God for mercy and favor (Nehemiah 1:5-11). When he stood before the king he prayed for wisdom (Nehemiah 2:4). When he was confronted by his enemies, he prayed for protection (Nehemiah 4:4-5). Spiritual leaders pray at all times with all kinds of prayers.

What makes prayer effective? Effective prayer should be honest. God doesn’t respond to the volume of our prayers. Some prayers are hardly audible but that doesn’t make them less effective. Others are very loud, and that’s still okay–after all God doesn’t have heart problems. God does not respond to the length of your prayers. Some can be spontaneous and short, like the one Peter prayed when he was sinking (Matthew 14:30). Others may take days and weeks. We should always remember that God is not a mean and an unjust judge (see Luke 18:1-8). He is our heavenly Father. What makes prayer effective is the honesty of the one praying and the faith that God will answer us when we call on Him.

Questions for Reflection:

  • Do you have a personal relationship with the heavenly Father through His Son Jesus Christ?
  • Is your life as a spiritual leader marked with fervent prayer?
  • How can you make prayer an essential part of your lifestyle?

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Shepherd-Leaders

1 Timothy 41-2 (NIV) In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction.

Anyone who has ever been involved in pastoral ministry knows how exciting it can be, especially when you see the people under your care growing and living their God-given dreams. But not all is rosy in this ministry. It can also be stressful and daunting. Many a pastor does not have a clear job description, let alone a defined work schedule. Many people in the congregation expect their pastors to be as perfect and sinless as Jesus Christ. But every pastor knows how imperfect and inadequate they are (if you doubt ask their spouses). Yet they have to be strong, always being there for those who are hurting—most of the time at the expense of missing their own family opportunities.

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Pastors are as human as anyone else. They hurt, they need, they face temptations, and they struggle. The salaries of many pastors around the world are way lower than those of an average CEO in their contexts. As a matter of fact most pastors in the majority world do not even earn a salary, so they resort to being bi-vocational in order sustain their families. The irony is that their church members expect them to give full-time commitment to their pastoral obligations, even when they are not compensated for their work.

It is alright to have high expectations of our pastors—and we should for every leader. But remember that we can easily confuse unrealistic expectations for high ones. Pastors cannot lead the church to the desired success unless everyone is involved; praying, encouraging and doing what they are supposed to do. Remember that the church is the “body of Christ” and just like you and me, pastors are just a part of that body. For the entire body to be healthy, every part has to do its part.

 

Instructions for Christian Living

1 Thessalonians 5:12-22 (NIV) Now we ask you, brothers and sisters, to acknowledge those who work hard among you, who care for you in the Lord and who admonish you. Hold them in the highest regard in love because of their work. Live in peace with each other. And we urge you, brothers and sisters, warn those who are idle and disruptive, encourage the disheartened, help the weak, be patient with everyone. Make sure that nobody pays back wrong for wrong, but always strive to do what is good for each other and for everyone else. Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus. Do not quench the Spirit. Do not treat prophecies with contempt but test them all; hold on to what is good, reject every kind of evil.

Relating with Other Christians (12-15)

Christian living is all about relationships. We relate vertically with God by worshiping and obeying Him. On the horizontal plane, we relate with other people. The Word of God tells us to honor our spiritual leaders. Pastoral ministry is a high calling and rewarding but it can also be hard and stressful. Pastors work hard to lead, teach and guide the people of God. Therefore believer are instructed to respect and honor them.  Respect for our spiritual leaders is a Christian virtue (see Hebrews 13:17). Have you been an encouragement to your spiritual leader lately? Find a practical way to let your them know that you appreciate the work they are doing.

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Christian Spiritual Disciplines (16-22)

Christian life is dynamic. For a Christian to grow in one’s relationship with God they ought to practice certain Godly habits. The Word of God highlights some of them such as: joyfulness, thanksgiving, being open to the work of the Spirit in our lives, discernment, and moral purity. We can be confident that living out the above disciplines is possible because of the grace of God available to us. The grace of God empowers us to do the will of God. God is wholly committed to us. He provides all that it takes for us to lead a life worthy of Him. Where in your Christian walk do you feel you are doing well? Which Godly habits do you think you need to develop?

 

Dealing with Life-Disruptions

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Psalm 46:2-3 (NIV)  Therefore we will not fear, though the earth give way and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam and the mountains quake with their surging. Selah

Yesterday I was greeted with some not-so-good news. Although it was not life threatening, it disrupts a fairly major course of action of a department I supervise. It affects our timelines and I am trying to figure out what good might be in it. As I was trying to deal with it, I was also handed a bill that was totally out of my budget—and yet it was for an important and urgent emergency need.

Life does not always loyally follow our plans and expectations and along the journey we encounter disruptions. Some may be minor, like the one I encountered yesterday, but others are major and devastating like the news one receives from the doctor when you had simply visited for a routine medical checkup. How should we respond when life does not deliver according to our plans? The natural (human) thing to do is to freeze, feel bad about ourselves and other people, or give up. But we know that not only is this kind of response unhelpful, it can also be destructive.

The better way is to look Up, beyond ourselves and circumstances, to God our Father and ask for wisdom and direction. God’s wisdom will ensure that we take the right course of action in any circumstances. The Bible says that God’s wisdom is way different from worldly wisdom.  But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere (James 3:17).

Food for Thought

  1. What life-disruptions are you dealing with right now?
  2. How can you glorify God in your circumstances?

 

Called to Be Influencers

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Matthew 5:13-16 (NIV)  “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. “You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.

 

Our Identity

“You are”

  1. The Salt of the Earth (verse 13)
  2. The Light of the World (verse 14)

Both of these images have a positive influence–salt as a preservative and enhancing flavor to the food, and light illuminating the world. They are both accessible in virtually anywhere in the world, to anyone, whether rich or poor.

BUT they also operate differently; salt has to disappear (dissolve) for it to be effective. So, one can say it works in a discreet, covert manner. On the other hand, light is necessarily visible: “people [do not] light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house” (Matthew 5:15).  Its influence is overt.

As followers of Jesus Christ, we have a calling to influence the world whether covertly or overtly. We are all challenged “to live a life worthy of the calling [we] have received” (Ephesians 4:1). In what ways can make your life count?

Our Mission

“Let Your Light Shine”

This is what we were called to do: to be change-agents, to be influencers. Just as light casts away the darkness that is around it, and salt enhances the flavor of the food, we are called to manifest God’s love, grace, mercy and justice in our various spheres of influence. God has wired and positioned us differently to accomplish this task. Apostle James says that our faith has practical ramifications. “Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world” (James 1:27). The woman named Tabitha (also known as Dorcas) lived as salt and light in her community. She “was always doing good and helping the poor” (Acts 9:36). When she died, the widows she had helped were “crying and showing [Peter] the robes and other clothing that Dorcas   had made while she was still with them (Acts 9:39). For these widows, the death of Tabitha meant that their light had gone off. How are you manifesting the light of Jesus in your community? Just like salt can only be effective when it is out of the saltshaker, we cannot shine while we keep our faith private. Our faith must necessarily be expressed in the context of the community.

Our Purpose

The Glory of God

“…let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).

After a good meal, no one ever praises the salt, for the flavor it enhances, instead the praise goes to the cook. We do not shine, to attract praise to ourselves but to the ONE who called us. As we shared last week, we were created to live for the audience of ONE, to make God look great. This is our life purpose.

Our faith must necessarily be expressed in the context of the community.

Your Attitude in Trials

Texts: James 1:2-182 Corinthians 1:1-11

Our attitudes, especially during tough times, are very important. They determine whether you soar above your challenges or sink under them. So how should we respond when we go through tough times?

  • Count it all joy

Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds (James 1:2)

  • Be hopeful. Even in the hardest, gravest moments of your life; God is with you. He is for you and not against you. He will work out something good out of your troubles.
  • We can be joyful in trials because of the promise of the reward (a crown of life) for those who endure. Blessed is the man who perseveres under trial, because when he has stood the test, he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love him (James 1:12).
  • LET YOUR TRIALS BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GOD TO DISPLAY HIS POWER. But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me. That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong (2 Corinthians 12:9-10).
  • Ask God for wisdom

If any of you lacks wisdom, he should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him (James 1:5).

  • Ask the Lord what He would want you to do in your situation
  • Believe that when you ask, God will answer you
  • Make decisions based on the wisdom you received from the Lord

This takes us to the next attitude…

  • Make the most out of your tough times

  • Apostle Paul’s example:

    • Paul wrote letters to churches
    • He preached the Gospel to the guards and those who met him
    • He maintained a positive outlook about his situation: “I am chained but the gospel is not chained” (cf. 2 Timothy 2:9)
  • King David’s Example

    • When he was a fugitive, running from King Saul, he provided leadership to those who sought for him.

David left Gath and escaped to the cave of Adullam. When his brothers and his father’s household heard about it, they went down to him there. All those who were in distress or in debt or discontented gathered around him, and he became their commander. About four hundred men were with him (1 Samuel 22:1-2).

    • One more example:

You might be out of work (meaning that you have more time on you). There are a number of things you could do:

      • Pray
      • Read
      • Write
      • Dream of the future that you envision (yes, never stop dreaming)
      • Visit and encourage others
      • Volunteer in a local community-based charity
  • Ask the Lord to deliver you from the trial.

Is any one of you in trouble? He should pray (James 5:13).

    • The Bible is full of examples of people who cried out to the Lord to deliver them out of their troubles—and He did. God has promised that when we call on His name, He will answer and rescue us from our troubles. And call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you, and you will honor me (Psalm 50:15)

 

  • Walk in faith.

    To walk in faith is to rely on God’s love, power and wisdom

    • The devil always wants to use trials to tempt us

What’s the difference between a trial and a temptation?

Using the example of Jesus Christ:

At the end of fasting for 40 days and nights, he was hungry and thirsty. The need (or desire) for food and water can be likened to a trial. But the enemy wanted Jesus to misuse His divine powers (in ways that were inconsistent with God’s word) to turn stones into food -this was a temptation

One of the tragedies of today’s Christianity is pragmatism, which basically goes like this: “If it works, then it’s OK.” We are told that the end justifies the means. But God is interested in both the means and the end. What we do and how we do it, equally matter to God.

The Lord’s purpose in trials is to make you mature—to become more like Jesus. However, Satan’s goal is to take advantage of your trials to tempt you to deny God. Faith makes you keep your focus on Jesus.

 

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GOD’S PURPOSE IN TRIALS

James 1:2 (NIV) Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds

  1. Trials are inevitable

I don’t like pain and I want to mute it at first as I can. Just like pain, tough times are a reality that is an equalizer. Everyone faces them.  It’s not something that one can wish away. We live in a generation that overemphasizes positive confession as if it’s a magic wand to attract what we want and shoo away what we do not desire. But no amount of positive confession will shield you from trials. To say that ”tough times are not my portion” is like a student confessing that “exams are not my portion.” To never want trials is like desiring to be promoted without undergoing training. The Bible says that “WHENEVER”, not “IF” “you face trials of many kinds.” Before He went to heaven, Jesus promised us that in this world we will have trials (John 16:33). Trials, like any training, are undesirable but necessary.

  1. Trials are diverse

The Bible says that they are of many kinds. Not only will you encounter tough times, you will do so in many areas and seasons of your live. For as long as we are alive and growing we will encounter challenges.  They could be related to your health, finances, relationships, ministry, profession, or anything else.

  1. You CAN benefit  from your trials – (James 1:3-4)

Trials are real; don’t pretend that they are not there. Many of them are painful, so we shouldn’t pretend to be happy when you are in pain. BUT you can be hopeful (and find peace in Jesus) – Phil. 4: 6-7 (more about attitudes next week). You can be hopeful and joyful because you know that the end will be greater. Any training worth its name is rigorous and tough (Heb. 12:7, 8)

Trials, like any training, are undesirable but necessary.

When people spend sleepless nights during times of examinations, it’s not because they enjoy sleepless nights but because you are looking forward to good grades at the end of the exam and a great career in the future. So, we are encouraged to joyfully endure trials because of the results they bring about in the end.

Trials are a like training institute. But we all know that training, even the best one, doesn’t guarantee success (otherwise only that who graduate from top notch schools would be successful). It is only when someone trains according to the instructions that they can succeed. So, don’t waste your pain; God is up to something.

What trials are you going through now? Trials are the pressure that tests the quality of your character.

Hebrews 12:11-13 (NIV) No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it. Therefore, strengthen your feeble arms and weak knees. “Make level paths for your feet,” so that the lame may not be disabled, but rather healed.

Are you feeling like trials are pushing you to the limit, that you are being stretched beyond what you can bear? Are your arms becoming “feeble” and your knees “weak?”  Do you feel like throwing in the towel? Ask the Lord for strength.

Instead let your response to trials encourage others to trust the Lord Jesus Christ and follow Him. But you can’t do this on your own, God has to help you. Tough times won’t last because God’s grace will sustain you

GOD’S PURPOSE IN TRIALS IS TO MAKE YOU MATURE – TO BECOME MORE LIKE JESUS CHRIST

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