Dealing With Life’s Interruptions

 Text: Mark 4:35-41

You can also watch this sermon on YouTube via this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_g4Si1z_f8&t=62s  

Teacher, don’t you care if we

I remember a number of times in my life when everything seemed to be headed to the right direction and then, boom; everything changed for the worse—or so I thought. One such incident happened years ago when I was a seminary student. I had concluded my first year and was looking forward to two other exciting years of being prepared for ministry. Life was good! Then one morning I was causally checking my emails, I saw one from my sponsor. I was sort of excited, excepting to receive some good news. Were they informing me that funds were available to go and visit my family? Was it a ministry update that I need to be aware of?  On opening the email, I wasn’t ready for what I found. They were basically letting me know that they were no longer going to fund my studies at the seminary and were advising me to go back to my country. To say that I was shocked is an understatement. I froze. My body ached instantly. So many questions ran through my mind. I was angry; I was confused. I felt betrayed and alone on that cold winter morning, in that dormitory room in South Korea.

I know that many of you can relate with my experience of dealing with life’s interruptions. For some of you, it was a routine visit to the doctor’s office when you received news that would change your life  forever. Maybe it was a phone call you received from a spouse letting you know that your relationship was no more. For the last two or three months the world has faced interruptions at a scale it has never experienced before. The coronavirus has brought the world systems to their knees. No one seems to know the answer. I recently was reading from Facebook post of one of the key persons in the tourism sector in my country. He said that this year 2020 was promising to be one of the best years in the tourist industry. Now everything is at a halt. Companies are thinking of downsizing.

Have you wondered where God is in all this? Has he taken a vacation and left the virus to wreak havoc on the world? Is He executing judgment on His stubborn and unrepentant people? I have heard comments similar to these but I think when we think of God that way we miss the whole point of the purpose of life’s interruptions. I believe that God has an answer to our dilemmas when we face interruptions in our lives. Recently, a friend of mine shared with me a passage from Mark 4:35-41, and I felt that the Lord was speaking to the church about the times we live in.

Let us read along:

35 That day when evening came, he said to his disciples, “Let us go over to the other side.” 36 Leaving the crowd behind, they took him along, just as he was, in the boat. There were also other boats with him.

So up until this time, life looks good. Apparently, it seems like the disciples are in charge and Jesus is simply tagging along: they took him along, just as he was, in the boat. They are the masters on the lake. They are in charge of the boat and the oars. They know the destination. Then, boom!

 37 A furious squall came up, and the waves broke over the boat, so that it was nearly swamped. 

Then comes the interruption. No one saw this coming. They have no idea what to do. They have run out of options. But then then, there is something rather unusual:

38 Jesus was in the stern, sleeping on a cushion. Think about that for a moment. 38 Jesus was in the stern, sleeping on a cushion. Okay let’s go back to the previous verse and read again, just in case you missed it.  37 A furious squall came up, and the waves broke over the boat, so that it was nearly swamped. 

Jesus was sleeping—literally! Whatever the reason was for this kind of deep sleep, it simply shows how Jesus was just as human as anyone of us. He probably was too exhausted from the previous ministry engagements.

The disciples woke him and said to him, “Teacher, don’t you care if we drown?” The disciples actually thought they were all (including Jesus?) were going to drown! And, Jesus was just sleeping—unbothered by the impeding catastrophe. Have you ever been in a situation where you were like, “God, where are you?”

But let us not miss the main point here. Jesus was there in the boat. Sleeping, yes; but He was present. In fact what makes the humanity of Jesus relevant to our human experiences, including life’s interruptions, is that He shares in our human experiences. He is there when we need Him.

39 He got up, rebuked the wind and said to the waves, “Quiet! Be still!” Then the wind died down and it was completely calm.

Think about this again: Jesus rebuked the storm. He spoke to the storm as though it had ears and was listening—and indeed it was. He commanded the waves to be quiet and still. He spoke to something inanimate and impersonal. Why? It is because, everything—I mean everything is under His sovereign power. Your situation is under His sovereign power. The coronavirus is under His sovereign power. Everything God created can listen to Him. I always tell people that everything that has a name has a knee. It bows to the name of Jesus. When life becomes interrupted, when the storms of life come, remember that JESUS IS RIGHT THERE WITH YOU AND THAT HE IS IN CONTROL. He was with me on that cold winter morning in South Korea when I felt like the world was caving in around me. He is with you when you feel helpless and defeated. He has sovereign power over your situation and the predicaments that we face every day.

40 He said to his disciples, “Why are you so afraid? Do you still have no faith?”

41 They were terrified and asked each other, “Who is this? Even the wind and the waves obey him!”

God still calls us to have faith. In times when everyone is panicking and living in fear, we need to trust Him. We need to speak His word to our circumstances. Jesus told us that we can speak to mountains. We can believe God to mend our brokenness and restore us. We can trust Him to guide us through the darkest valleys of our lives. He is able to lam the storms of our lives.

Let us pray:

Our heavenly Father, we come to you today in the face of everything we are going through. We do not have the answers to the world’s problems but You do. Only you can calm the storms of our lives. We particularly pray that you will calm the storm of the coronavirus that is ravaging the world. We speak hope to the hopeless world. We speak life where there is death. We speak healing where there is sickness and brokenness. In the name of Jesus, we have prayed, amen.

You can also watch this sermon on YouTube via this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_g4Si1z_f8&t=62s  

Too Good for the World

Hebrews 11:26-38 (NIV) Some faced jeers and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were put to death by stoning; they were sawed in two; they were killed by the sword. They went about in sheepskins and goatskins, destitute, persecuted and mistreated—the world was not worthy of them. They wandered in deserts and mountains, living in caves and in holes in the ground.

Hebrews 11 is one of my favorite chapters. Some commentators have described it as a hall of fame for men and women who exhibited their faith in God. Yet, we can be gripped by a thriller-like description of the lives of these men that we skip one thing that really defined them. One of the most profound statements about these heroes of faith is mentioned almost anecdotally. “The world was not worthy of them” (Hebrews 11:38). What was so special about these men and women that, so to speak, made them too good for the world?

I think that what makes them special is that their singular focus was on heaven. This, however, does not mean that that they were “too heavenly minded to be of any earthly good;” far from it. They were grounded in the realities of their times. They lived, raised families, conducted business; they were as human as anyone could be. But they were not attached to this world. As a matter of fact, very few people could have even noticed that these people actually existed. They were not politically powerful or economically affluent. It seems some were even homeless and “wandered in deserts and mountains, living in caves and in holes in the ground” (Heb. 11:38). So, by this world’s standards, they were really insignificant.

But this did not matter to them. Their allegiance was to Jesus Christ. They lived for God and not this world—and whatever it presents. Could the same be said of us? Are we singularly committed to the cause of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ? Is our faith in God the grid through which we see everything else? Or have we blended with the world so much that it seems like this is where we truly belong?

The world was not good enough for them

The City and God

Hebrews 11:16 (NIV). Instead, they were longing for a better country—a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them.

What emotions does the word “city” evoke in you? Are they feelings of hope, energy and excitement; or fear, despair and loneliness? Some people are energized by the city. It provides space to nurture and fulfill their dreams. Others find it as a necessary evil. It is a place where they need to be in order to survive. Still others view the city with suspicion. They consider it to be to be disruptive to what could otherwise be a normal life—whatever that life is.

I recently participated in a research on faith and the city, exploring the areas of collaboration between Christian organizations and urban authorities in my city. One of the questions we asked the research participants was rather philosophical: “Is the city home?” We were surprised by some of the responses. Many people in my city do not consider it to be “home.” Although many of these people have been in the city for all their adult life, they still have strong attachments with their ancestral homes—villages where they will be buried when they die!

But what has the city got to do with faith? The notion of cities is pervasive in the Bible—for good and not-so-good reasons. The word “city” appears over 600 times in the English Bible. If we consider that a city is a place where everything is amplified—whether it is production, consumption, population, wealth, poverty, power or vulnerability—then we have to take cities seriously. God does take cities seriously.

How then should Christians engage with their cities? I think one of the helpful motifs when it comes to engaging our cities is the “city of God” which He has prepared for His people (Heb. 11:16). This should motivate us to love our cities. God has a special purpose for your city. You should therefore, pray for your city. Get involved in initiatives to transform your city, one small step at a time. Also, let your city motivate you to long for the perfect city in heaven.

God has a special purpose for your cityPrayer

Lord, I thank you for my city! I pray that you help me to see my city through Your eyes. Help me to love and seek for the flourishing of my city. In Jesus’ name I pray, amen.

Faith – Beyond Positive Confession

Hebrews 11:1-3(NIV). Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.  This is what the ancients were commended for. By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible.

The writer of the letter to the Hebrews is encouraging the believers to remain faithful to the God who called them. Faith is one of the subjects that widely preached about, especially in my part of the world. For some, faith is kind of a currency that one needs to get whatever they want. It is like some kind of magic that one needs in order to leap into the unknown and the impossible. According to some preachers, faith is all about feeling and thinking positively about ourselves and circumstances—and our potential to become or achieve anything we want. We are the objects of faith. We are essentially taught to trust in ourselves.

This, however, is different from biblical faith, whose object is the Triune God. Faith is the confident hope; the promised good beyond us. This hope is more than mere optimism; it derives from God. Faith—genuine faith—is our response to God’s promises. But if the character of the One who promises were flawed, we would have no confidence in Him. So, essentially, our Christian faith is premised on the unchanging character of the living God, the creator of heaven and earth. We can believe in His Word because it is consistent with who He is.

Christian faith begins and ends with God. It is Him who sets the agenda. It is Him who knows the end—the goal, the purpose, the consummation—of all things. It is the almighty God who is in charge of every single detail. Our role, therefore, is to respond to Him in obedience and trust. This trust is based on our relationship with Him as our heavenly Father. He knows what is best for us even though it might not seem to be what we really wanted.

Sometimes our faith will result in us accomplishing great things, humanly speaking. At other times our faith in God could result in us losing the very things we hold dear, including our own lives. In other words, it is God who sets the agenda; not us. Faith is not about us winning or losing but rather honoring God with our lives and everything else.

And without faith it is impossible to please God

REFLECTION

In what ways can the faith of those who went before you motivate you to keep trusting in God?

PRAYER

Dear heavenly Father, You are faithful. Your Word is trust worthy. Please teach me to trust in You, especially during times when things may not be going my way. In Jesus’ name I pray, amen.

Fake Shepherds

Acts 20:28-30: Keep watch over yourselves and all the flock of which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers. Be shepherds of the church of God, which he bought with his own blood. I know that after I leave, savage wolves will come in among you and will not spare the flock.  Even from your own number men will arise and distort the truth in order to draw away disciples after them.

In recent years, the world has been introduced to a phenomenon of the so-called fake news, that is, news that intended to misinform and mislead in order to influence public opinion on certain national or global issues. Sadly, the perpetuation of false information is not only limited to the public arena but it is also pervasive in the church.

Jesus declares that “I am the good shepherd” (John 10:11). This is in contrast to the fake shepherds. He calls them “thieves and robbers” (John 10:8) or “the hired hand (John 10:12). They are basically selfish and have no interest in the welfare of the people who follow them. Apostle Paul refers to them as “savage wolves.” They are greedy. They have no fear of God. They use the name of God to advance their own selfish interests. Instead of pointing people to Christ, they draw away disciples after them (Acts 20:30). Their mission is to advance Satan’s agenda, that is, to “to steal and kill and destroy.”

Their methods are also clear. They distort the truth of God’s word. They have an unhealthy interest in controversies. Like a thief, they can be sneaky, secretive, and manipulative. Others are bold and forceful like robbers. Many are indifferent or even hostile to those who attempt to correct them.

When we commit ourselves to godly leadership of a local church that faithfully teaches the Word of God, we will be able to discern these fake shepherds. More importantly, we should emulate the life and teachings of the Good and Chief Shepherd, Jesus Christ.

Be shepherds of the church of God,

The Risk of Following Jesus

It was Preparation Day (that is, the day before the Sabbath). So as evening approached, Joseph of Arimathea, a prominent member of the Council, who was himself waiting for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for Jesus’ body. Pilate was surprised to hear that he was already dead. Summoning the centurion, he asked him if Jesus had already died. When he learned from the centurion that it was so, he gave the body to Joseph. So Joseph bought some linen cloth, took down the body, wrapped it in the linen, and placed it in a tomb cut out of rock. Then he rolled a stone against the entrance of the tomb. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joseph saw where he was laid.

Before I became a Christian, everything I heard about following Jesus Christ was good and attractive—and I think this experience is shared by many other believers. But as I started reading the Bible, I realized that Jesus does not promise that the journey will be easy for those who would want to follow Him. One has to take serious considerations about the implications of being His disciple. He, in fact likens following Him to carrying the cross on a daily basis. Our concept of the cross has been distorted due to the time and culture gap between us and the time of Jesus. For us it is a harmless or even beautiful artifact or piece of jewelry.  But during the era of the Roman Empire, only those who were about to be executed carried their crosses to the place of crucifixion. So, carrying the cross is akin to dying—and on a daily basis.

Those who take a stand for what Jesus stands for risk being hated, called names, ostracized, treated unjustly, imprisoned or even killed. The story of Joseph of Arimathea illustrates the kind of boldness every believer needs in order to identify with Jesus. Although, he was among the most respected people in the Jewish religious establishment, Joseph risked his reputation and perhaps his carrier to identify with Jesus. Hitherto he had been a secret disciple of Jesus. But Joseph was not alone. There were two other women following. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joseph had been with Jesus right for most of His public ministry. They followed their Master to the end.

Why would anyone risk being shunned by family and close friends, arrested or killed for the sake of Jesus? It is not because of what the world could offer us in this life but rather of what Jesus promises us both in this life and the life to come. Although we might lose everything—including our own lives, when we have Jesus we have everything.

Have you ever had to make hard choices for the sake of following Jesus? How are you going to live for Him today; this week?

when we have Jesus we have everything

I Want to See

Mark 10:46-52 (NIV)

Then they came to Jericho. As Jesus and his disciples, together with a large crowd, were leaving the city, a blind man, Bartimaeus (which means “son of Timaeus”), was sitting by the roadside begging. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!”

 

It probably started like just another day for blind Bartimaeus. He goes to his usual place hoping that some kind souls would help him out with some little money but then something happens. He hears that Jesus is passing by accompanied by a large crowd of people. Could this be his turning point? Could the One who has performed many miracles change his life?  Jesus hears the cry of Bartimaeus and stops. Jesus calls for him. When he is asked what the Lord would do for him, he responds that “I want to see.” He is aware of his condition. He knows that only the Lord can change it.

One of the stated ministry objectives of Jesus Christ was to open the eyes of the blind. Bartimaeus’ physical blindness reminds us of our own spiritual blindness. There are many things that can blind us blinds us from seeing things God’s way.

One of them is our culture.  Our culture conditions us to think and act in certain ways. Sometimes some of these ways are not consistent with God’s Word. The cultural practices we may consider to be “Christian” may actually be detestable before God. The Bible cautions us against being conformed to the standards of the world (Rom. 12:2). It is, therefore important for us to be aware of our cultural prejudices as we study God’s Word and seek to follow Him.

The other reason why we can be spiritually blind is because of our sinful tendencies—wanting to have our own way rather than the Lord’s. The Bible calls it the “hardness of the heart” (Mark 10:5). As we continually submit to the Lordship of Jesus Christ, the spiritual scales that blind us get removed and our desires become more and more aligned to the will of God.

We must acknowledge the sheer fact that we are human and limited in many ways. Sometimes we can have faulty expectations from the Lord. Paul says that our knowledge is partial (1 Cor. 13:9). We, therefore, need to go to the Lord every day and ask Him to open our eyes to see things as He sees them.

PRAYER:

Dear Lord, open my spiritual eyes so that I may see You clearly. In Jesus’ name I pray, amen.

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