The Coronavirus, the Lockdown and God’s Sovereignty

Text: 2 Kings 6:24-7:20

By Pastor Emmanuel Akatukunda

 

God is able to do more

I find that today’s passage resonates with what we are currently going through due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The passage is about the Reality, Your Experiences and God’s Sovereignty.

  1. The Reality:

2 Kings 6:24-25: 24 Some time later, Ben-Hadad king of Aram mobilized his entire army and marched up and laid siege to Samaria. 25 There was a great famine in the city; the siege lasted so long that a donkey’s head sold for eighty shekels of silver, and a quarter of a cab of seed pods for five shekels.

The King of Aram attacked Israel and put the city of Samaria (Israel’s capital) under a siege (or lockdown) for 2 years. No one of the inhabitants of Samaria was able to come into or go out of the city. Can you imagine how terrible that must have been? We have been under lockdown for seven weeks and for many of us if feels like it’s been seven years! The lockdown was extreme that it led to a severe famine in Samaria that reduced decent people to cannibalism. Can you imagine a mother cooking her own child for dinner? Recently, there was a story in the media of a woman who was found “cooking” stones for her children. She was desperate and put the stones in the pan to give her children a false hope that it was food. Thankfully some people, after watching a video of her story, responded by providing her with supplies. Praise God! But there are probably those who are not lucky enough to get the attention of people out there. The situation is indeed desperate.

  1. Your Experiences:

2 Kings 6:26-27: As the king of Israel was passing by on the wall, a woman cried to him, “Help me, my lord the king!” 27 The king replied, “If the LORD does not help you, where can I get help for you? From the threshing floor? From the winepress?”

The King of Israel represents anyone in a place of leadership or responsibility whether it is a leader in a home, head of an organization or a pastor of a congregation.

The Woman represents an ordinary person dealing with the trauma of personal loss. Unfortunately for her, even the king could not help her. It was unfortunate enough to lose her son in that way. It was even more frustrating that she could not get justice from the king. What kind of trauma, tragedies and personal losses are you dealing with?

Her conversation with the king reveals the deep vulnerability of both the woman and the king. Let’s turn to the story:

 “Help me, my lord the king!” The woman is appealing to the highest authority in the land. Surely, the king must have all the answers. Maybe you find yourself in the place of the woman, seeking for help from those whom you think should be able to help you. It could be your pastor, a community leader, the employer, the government. Then you realise that they are as vulnerable and helpless as you are.

Now listen to the king’s response:

“If the LORD does not help you, where can I get help for you?

The king raises more questions than answers. He gives a theological response to the woman’s moral and practical question. Wait a minute; he did not even wait to listen to the woman’s plea. “If the LORD does not help you, where can I get help for you?

  • In one sense the king acknowledges that the only true help anyone can receive is from God. God is our only source of help. Even kings—who represent the most powerful people—are powerless without God’s help. If there is one thing the coronavirus pandemic has taught us, it is that even the most powerful people in this world are deeply vulnerable and helpless.
  • In another sense, the king is implying that God has either failed or refused to help His people. “If the LORD does not help you, where can I get help for you?

In this question, we can feel a sense of resignation by the king. He had given up. He had run out of options. He was an impotent king who could not protect, defend or even provide for his subjects.

Some of us have found ourselves in that place; feeling incapable and unable to fulfill our responsibilities. Like the king, you find muttering to yourself, “if God does not help them, where can I get help?” Our resources are exhausted—and these are not only financial and material resources. Many of us feel that our emotional resources are exhausted too. We have run out of options. There is no money on our bank accounts, we have no food in our gardens (some of us have no gardens at all), we have lost our jobs, we have lost our businesses, we have lost our families.

Some of us have found ourselves in that place; feeling incapable and unable to fulfill our responsibilities. Like the king, you find muttering to yourself, “if God does not help them, where can I get help?”

2 Kings 6:30-31: When the king heard the woman’s words, he tore his robes. As he went along the wall, the people looked, and they saw that, under his robes, he had sackcloth on his body. 31 He said, “May God deal with me, be it ever so severely, if the head of Elisha son of Shaphat remains on his shoulders today!”

The king was horrified, in anguish, and angry. How many can identify with those emotions. Sometimes we are not even sure whom we are angry at: it could be the government, the situation, your employer or your spouse. We are hurting, traumatized, broken, lost and angry.

The king was particularly angry with Elisha, the prophet. Somehow, the king believed that Elisha could be having a solution to the situation or at least he knew where the problem was coming from. Of course, the king himself knew where the problem was coming from!

  1. God’s Sovereignty:

As a prophet, Elisha was God’s spokesperson to the people of Israel. He would receive God’s Word and then communicate to the people. What was God saying?

2 Kings 7:1: Elisha replied, “Hear the word of the LORD. This is what the LORD says: About this time tomorrow, a seah of the finest flour will sell for a shekel and two seahs of barley for a shekel at the gate of Samaria.”

Elisha told the king that God was going to turn things around in ways that are humanly impossible. God has promised help. It would come sooner than anyone expected. Just within 24 hours the siege would be lifted and there would me more than enough food for everyone at a very cheap price. God was going to do what was humanly impossible with effects that were unbelievable. Unlike the kings of this world, God is sovereign. He does what no one else can do. When God works, He amazes everyone!

  • How can it be that God could save someone like me?
  • How could God turn my situation around, just like that?

But then there was this king’s aide. He could not believe any of Elisha’s words. They were too good to be true. He sarcastically responded: “Look, even if the LORD should open the floodgates of the heavens, could this happen?” (2 Kings 7:2).

Have you come to a point whereby you have stopped believing God to do amazing things in your life? Have you given up

  • Praying for the salvation of a loved one
  • Believing God for healing
  • Trusting God to help you break that destructive habit
  • Believing God to turn around your marriage?
  • Praying for your business?

Do you put up a brave face when people are around you but inside you are broken; you have given up; you have come to your wits end? Like the king’s guard, you can easily reduce the power of God’s Word to your experiences. But God is sovereign.

There is no situation that God cannot turn around—including those that are humanly impossible.

The amazing news is that when we continue to read the story, God used just four lepers to turn things around. The Arameans ran away even when no one was chasing them. The people of Israel broke the siege, went out and plundered the camp of the Arameans. So a seah of the finest flour sold for a shekel, and two seahs of barley sold for a shekel, as the LORD had said (2 Kings 7:16).

There is no situation that God cannot turn around—including those that are humanly impossible. Nothing is impossible with Him, including your current situation. The Bible says that God “is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine” (Ephesians 3:20). Do not allow your circumstances to distort your view of God and what He can do. The reality around you, and your experiences are all subject to God’s sovereignty. Do not stop believing God.

One thought on “The Coronavirus, the Lockdown and God’s Sovereignty

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s